DPHSS


CHANGES IN MONTHLY INCOME THAT MUST BE REPORTED
Release #2003-65, October 23, 2003

PeterJohn D. Camacho, Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS) announces that, beginning November 1, 2003, the amount of changes in earned and unearned income that must be reported by recipients of the Food Stamp Program, Old Age Assistance (OAA), Aid to the Blind (AB), Aid to the Permanently and Totally Disabled (APTD) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) has been revised as follows:

Changes in Monthly Income that Must be Reported

Type of Income Previous Amount Effective 11/01/03
Earned income More than $25/month More than $100/month
Unearned income More than $25/month More than $50/month

The requirement to report other changes in household circumstances - such as the addition or loss of a household member, the acquisition of a licensed vehicle, changes in residence and shelter costs - has not changed. Certified households are reminded to report any changes within 10 days of the date the change becomes known to the household via Change Report Form.

Please call your caseworker if you have any questions regarding this matter.

NORTHERN: 635-7466
MANGILAO: 735-7245
SOUTHERN: 828-7542

/s/
PETERJOHN D. CAMACHO, MPH


GUAM'S ADULT PROGRAMS BENEFITS INCREASED EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 1, 2003
Release #2003-64, October 17, 2003

PeterJohn Camacho, DPHSS Director, announces that benefits to recipients of Guam's Adult Programs (Old Age Assistance, Aid to the Blind, and Aid to the Permanent and Totally Disabled), which were reduced by 57% in April of 2002, have been restored to 100% effective October 1, 2003.

The Director also announces that maximum monthly allotments for Guam's Food Stamp Program were increased effective October 1, 2003.

Clients who have any questions regarding the increases may contact their caseworker for more information.

/s/
PETERJOHN D. CAMACHO, MPH


FOOD STAMP ELIGIBILITY RESTORED TO QUALIFIED ALIEN CHILDREN
Release #2003-57, September 16, 2003

PeterJohn D. Camacho, Acting Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS) announces that beginning October 1, 2003, children who are qualified aliens AND who have not turned 18 years old may be eligible regardless of the date they entered the United States. The Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-171), commonly known as the 2002 Farm Bill, restored food stamp eligibility, effective April 1, 2003, to most qualified aliens lawfully admitted for permanent residence in the United States and who have lived in the United States for five years or longer.

Qualified aliens are aliens lawfully admitted for permanent residence (green card holders) or aliens who have been granted special status by INS such as asylee, refugee, parolee or deportee status.

Currently participating Food Stamp households with a potentially eligible qualified alien child, may report this information via Change Report to their caseworker beginning September 1, 2003. Potentially eligible qualified aliens may apply at any of the Food Stamp Offices in Mangilao, Dededo, or Inarajan.

Households must meet all other eligibility criteria, in addition to meeting qualified alien status.

/s/
PETERJOHN D. CAMACHO, MPH


HALLOWEEN SAFETY ADVISORIES
Release #2003-66, October 27, 2003

Attached herewith are five (5) public service announcements (PSA’s). We are requesting that they be announced repeatedly until Friday, October 31, 2003 (Halloween day). Dangko’lo na Si Yu’os Ma’ase.

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT #1

ADVISORY ON DECORATIVE CONTACT LENSES

The Division of Environmental Health of the Department of Public Health and Social Services in conjunction with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) would like to warn the public about serious risks of using decorative contact lenses without the involvement of an eye care professional.

The USFDA has received reports of corneal ulcers associated with wearing these contact lenses in excess of the recommended period. Corneal ulcers can progress rapidly, and, if left untreated, could lead to infection of the eye. Uncontrolled infection can lead to corneal scarring and vision impairment with the most severe cases resulting in blindness and eye loss.

Other risks associated with the use of decorative eye lenses include: conjunctivitis (an infection of the eye); corneal edema (swelling); allergic reaction and corneal abrasion due to poor lens fit. Other problems may include reduction in visual acuity (sight), contrast sensitivity and other visual functions, resulting in interference with driving and other activities.

Although there have been no local reports of any importation and distribution of decorative contact lenses in the absence of an eye care professional, the Department of Public Health and Social Services and FDA strongly urges consumers not to use decorative contact lenses unless they have seen an eye care professional and have obtained proper fitting and instructions for using the product.

Consumers are asked to report problems or complaints to the Bureau of Professional Support Services of the Division of Environmental Health at 735-7221.


PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT #2

The Division of Environmental Health of the Department of Public Health and Social Services would like to inform the public of some:

HALLOWEEN SAFETY TIPS

Related to TREATS

o Children shouldn’t snack while trick-or-treating, before parents have a chance to inspect the goodies. To help prevent munching, give children a snack or light meal before they go—don’t send them out on an empty stomach.

o Tell children not to accept—and, especially, not to eat—anything that isn’t commercially wrapped or packaged.

o When children bring their treats home, discard any homemade candy or baked goods, especially if you don’t know who manufactured it. Parents of young children should also remove any choking hazards such as gum, peanuts, hard candies, or small toys.

o Wash all fresh fruit thoroughly, inspect it for holes, including small punctures, and cut it open before allowing children to eat it.

o Inspect commercially wrapped treats for signs of tampering, such as an unusual appearance or discoloration, tiny pinholes, or tears in wrappers. Save anything that looks suspicious. Any signs of tampering should be reported to the Guam Police Department.

o Carefully examine any toy or novelty items received by trick-or-treaters under 3 years of age. Do not allow young children to have any items that are small enough to present a choking hazard or that have small parts or components that could separate during use and present a choking hazard.

o If juice or cider is served to children at Halloween parties, make sure it is pasteurized or otherwise treated to destroy harmful bacteria. Juice or cider that has not been treated will say so on the label.

Consumers who have any questions are asked to contact the Bureau of Professional Support Services at 735-7221.


PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT #3

The Division of Environmental Health of the Department of Public Health and Social Services would like to inform the public of some:

HALLOWEEN SAFETY TIPS

Related to NOVELTY MAKEUP

To help keep you from getting a rash, swollen eyelids, or other problems in using novelty makeup:

o Follow all directions carefully.
o Don’t decorate your face with things that aren’t intended for your skin.
o Like soap, some things are okay for your skin, but not in your eyes. Some face paint or other makeup may say on the label that it is not for use near the eyes. Even if the label has a picture of people wearing it near their eyes, don’t assume that it is okay for use near the eyes.
o Even products intended for use near your eyes can sometimes irritate your skin if you use too much.
o If you’re decorating your skin with something you’ve never used before, you might try a dab of it on your arm for a couple of days to check for an allergic reaction BEFORE you put it on your face. This is especially good to do if you have sensitive skin or allergies.

When the fun and partying is over….

o Don’t go to bed with your makeup on.
o Wearing it too long can irritate your skin, and bits of makeup can flake off or smear and get into your eyes.
o It is important to follow labeling directions when removing your novelty makeup. If it says to remove it with soap and water, use soap and water. If it says to use eye makeup remover, use eye makeup remover. You will get better results at removing novelty makeup using the method recommended by the manufacturer.
o Remember that your eye is a delicate, sensitive area. Remove makeup gently.

Consumers who experience a bad reaction to using novelty makeup are advised to contact the Bureau of Professional Support Services’ Division of Environmental Health of the Department of Public Health and Social Services at 735-7221.

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT #4

The Division of Environmental Health of the Department of Public Health and Social Services would like to inform the public of some:

HALLOWEEN SAFETY TIPS

Related to COSTUMES

o When purchasing masks, beards, and wigs, look for flame resistant fabrics, such as nylon or polyester or look for the label “Flame Resistant.” Flame resistant fabrics will resist burning and should extinguish quickly. To minimize the risk of contact with candles and other fire sources, avoid costumes made with flimsy materials and outfits with big, baggy sleeves or billowing skirts.

o Purchase or make costumes that are bright and clearly visible to motorists.

o Wear reflective tape. This will glow in the beam of a car’s headlights and increase visibility during dusk and darkness. Bags and sacks should be light colored or decorated with reflective tape.

o Children should carry flashlights to see and be seen.

o Costumes should be well-fitted and not drag on the ground to guard against trips and falls.

o Children should wear well-fitting, sturdy shoes. Oversized high heels are not a good idea, especially when wearing long, bulky costumes.

o Tie hats and scarves securely to prevent them from slipping over children’s eyes and obstructing vision.

o If your child wears a mask, make sure it fits securely, provides adequate ventilation, and has eye holes large enough to allow full vision.

o Swords, knives and similar costume accessories should be made of soft, flexible material.

Consumers who have any questions are asked to contact the Bureau of Professional Support Services at 735-7221.

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT #5

The Division of Environmental Health of the Department of Public Health and Social Services would like to inform the public of some:

HALLOWEEN SAFETY TIPS

Related to DECORATIONS

o Keep candles and jack-o-lanterns away from landings and doorsteps where costumes could brush against the flame.

o Remove obstacles from lawns, steps and porches when expecting trick-o-treaters.

o Indoors, keep candles and jack-o-lanterns away from curtains, decorations and other combustibles that could be ignited.

o Indoors or outside, use only lights that have been tested for safety by a recognized testing laboratory. This is usually identified on labeling, such as “UL” label.

o Check each set of lights, new or old, for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires, or loose connections. Discard damaged sets.

o Don’t overload extension cords.

Consumers who have any questions are asked to contact the Bureau of Professional Support Services at 735-7221.

/s/
PETERJOHN D. CAMACHO, MPH


CHANGES IN MONTHLY INCOME THAT MUST BE REPORTED
Release #2003-65, October 23, 2003

PeterJohn D. Camacho, Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS) announces that, beginning November 1, 2003, the amount of changes in earned and unearned income that must be reported by recipients of the Food Stamp Program, Old Age Assistance (OAA), Aid to the Blind (AB), Aid to the Permanently and Totally Disabled (APTD) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) has been revised as follows:

Changes in Monthly Income that Must be Reported

Type of Income Previous Amount Effective 11/01/03
Earned income More than $25/month More than $100/month
Unearned income More than $25/month More than $50/month

The requirement to report other changes in household circumstances - such as the addition or loss of a household member, the acquisition of a licensed vehicle, changes in residence and shelter costs - has not changed. Certified households are reminded to report any changes within 10 days of the date the change becomes known to the household via Change Report Form.

Please call your caseworker if you have any questions regarding this matter.

NORTHERN: 635-7466
MANGILAO: 735-7245
SOUTHERN: 828-7542

/s/
PETERJOHN D. CAMACHO, MPH


GUAM'S ADULT PROGRAMS BENEFITS INCREASED EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 1, 2003
Release #2003-64, October 17, 2003

PeterJohn Camacho, DPHSS Director, announces that benefits to recipients of Guam's Adult Programs (Old Age Assistance, Aid to the Blind, and Aid to the Permanent and Totally Disabled), which were reduced by 57% in April of 2002, have been restored to 100% effective October 1, 2003.

The Director also announces that maximum monthly allotments for Guam's Food Stamp Program were increased effective October 1, 2003.

Clients who have any questions regarding the increases may contact their caseworker for more information.

/s/
PETERJOHN D. CAMACHO, MPH


FOOD STAMP ELIGIBILITY RESTORED TO QUALIFIED ALIEN CHILDREN
Release #2003-57, September 16, 2003

PeterJohn D. Camacho, Acting Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS) announces that beginning October 1, 2003, children who are qualified aliens AND who have not turned 18 years old may be eligible regardless of the date they entered the United States. The Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-171), commonly known as the 2002 Farm Bill, restored food stamp eligibility, effective April 1, 2003, to most qualified aliens lawfully admitted for permanent residence in the United States and who have lived in the United States for five years or longer.

Qualified aliens are aliens lawfully admitted for permanent residence (green card holders) or aliens who have been granted special status by INS such as asylee, refugee, parolee or deportee status.

Currently participating Food Stamp households with a potentially eligible qualified alien child, may report this information via Change Report to their caseworker beginning September 1, 2003. Potentially eligible qualified aliens may apply at any of the Food Stamp Offices in Mangilao, Dededo, or Inarajan.

Households must meet all other eligibility criteria, in addition to meeting qualified alien status.

/s/
PETERJOHN D. CAMACHO, MPH


MAJURO MEASLES OUTBREAK
Release #2003-54, August 7, 2003

The Secretary of Health and Environment, Republic of the Marshall Islands, has informed health authorities on Guam of an outbreak of measles on the island of Majuro. Suspect cases were first noted about 10 days ago. To date, more than 40 suspect cases have been identified, all on Majuro, affecting most age groups up to age 40. Six of 10 patient specimens sent to the Hawaii Department of Health Laboratory were positive for measles IgM antibody indicating recent infection.

Response measures undertaken by the Marshall Islands health authorities to control this outbreak include enhanced surveillance for additional cases, immunization of case contacts, and island-wide efforts to vaccinate the under-immunized. These efforts are being extended to Kwajelein Atoll/Ebeye and the outer islands, where cases have not yet been noted. Majuro has had many visitors in the last few weeks, including hundreds associated with regional church gatherings, who are now returning to their home islands and elsewhere.

A measles mass immunization campaign was conducted on the island of Majuro last year, providing an extra dose of MMR to children aged 1 to 4, following a campaign in 1998 to reach the under-immunized under age 15. The last measles outbreak in the Marshall Islands was in 1988.

Although there have been no suspect cases of measles reported on Guam in recent weeks, local physicians have been advised of this outbreak in our region and asked to maintain a high level of awareness for the possibility of measles when seeing patients with fever and rash in their clinics.

Guam experienced a minor measles outbreak in 2002 (9 cases) and major outbreaks in 1993-4 (253 cases, including 3 deaths) and 1984 (104 cases). Because Guam receives many visitors from areas where measles is still common, it is important that we maintain a strong defense against the introduction of this disease to our island. Maintaining a high level of immunity to measles among the children of Guam is the best way to accomplish this.

This is an ideal time for all parents to review the vaccination status of their children and to contact their regular health care provider if they have doubts about the vaccination status of their children. It is recommended that all children be vaccinated for measles (MMR vaccine) at 1 and 4 years of age. Parents are reminded that children must have records of receiving 2 measles vaccinations before entering school on Guam.

/s/
PETERJOHN D. CAMACHO, MPH


SARS CONTROL MEASURES WILL CONTINUE
Release #2003-52, July 1, 2003

As reports of new cases of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome wane around the world, Guam has thankfully remained SARS-free throughout the entire epidemic. While the lack of even a single imported case on Guam resulted largely from the diligent efforts of SARS-affected countries to trace all contacts and prohibit international travel by possibly infected persons, many individuals, organizations, and agencies within our community have worked together tirelessly to be prepared just in case. Although SARS is now on the decline around the world and the World Health Organization no longer advises against travel to any location, Guam's level of vigilance will remain high. The Toronto experience of SARS resurgence soon after apparent control indicates the need for a cautious and gradual withdrawal of measures. In addition, the marked seasonality of similar viruses like influenza leads to concern that SARS may re-emerge when cooler weather arrives in the Northern Hemisphere. During these next few months, the most visible anti-SARS measures may gradually taper off, but it is essential to maintain heightened levels of awareness and preparedness in case SARS re-emerges. This ensures that any cases that do appear are identified as quickly as possible and are managed in a way that minimizes spread of the disease.

Guam's ongoing SARS vigilance strategy will closely follow recommendations of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization, and remain flexible in case new outbreaks of SARS or other illnesses require rapid modification. Similar to the wide-ranging cooperation required over the past few months to ensure Guam's SARS preparedness, coordinated measures by a variety of private and public entities will ensure ongoing vigilance. These are outlined in more detail below:

At the borders:

  • CDC/DPHSS personnel to meet each flight from recent SARS affected areas to visually inspect deplaning passengers for illness (final date as per U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-current plan Oct 2003).
  • CDC assignee to remain on Guam to assist with border measures and reporting back to U.S. CDC (final date as per CDC-at least through 8/03)
  • Continued distribution of CDC SARS Health Alert Notices to all visitors arriving to Guam from Asian destinations at both GIAA and Port Authority (final date as per CDC)
  • Guam Customs and airline personnel to continue careful observation for possibly ill arriving visitors and notify DPHSS promptly.

At Health Care Facilities:

  • GMHA to finalize preparation of Skilled Nursing Unit as negative-pressure isolation facility.
  • GMH ER to continue special triage procedures which quickly identify and isolate any potentially contagious respiratory disease.
  • All health care facilities to ensure adequate and ongoing training of personnel regarding careful infection control procedures.
  • All health care facilities and involved agencies to ensure a sufficient stockpile of personal protective equipment.
  • GMHA to resume ongoing N95 mask fit testing program.
  • Prompt reporting to DPHSS of all reportable diseases, as well as any unusual illnesses for investigation
  • Universal respiratory precautions (surgical masks, possible isolation) to be used in health care facilities when dealing with febrile patients with acute respiratory illness.
  • Community physicians advised to obtain specialist consultation on any patient with severe atypical and/or community-acquired pneumonia or any patient with unusual presentation or clinical course.
  • Intensive influenza vaccination this fall in order to minimize diagnostic confusion should SARS re-emerge; special emphasis on high risk groups, including health care professionals and elderly.

At DPHSS:

  • DPHSS will compile and maintain a SARS operational manual in case of SARS re-emergence.
  • DPHSS to continue to work with regional labs to ensure any rapid and sensitive SARS test that becomes available will be accessible to Guam.
  • Territorial Epidemiologist to continue monthly review of respiratory illness seen at GMH ER in order to monitor trends.
  • New and pertinent information regarding SARS to be sent out regularly to community health providers via Health Alert Network in order to maintain high level of SARS awareness

In the Community:

  • SARS educational material to be distributed by DPHSS Health Education personnel via presentations, multilingual fact sheets, website, etc.
  • DPHSS website (dphss.govguam.net) to be updated regularly.
  • All government agencies continue participation in Bioterrorism preparedness activities, including drills, training, coordination, etc.

Finally, everyone in our community has a role to play in the prevention of transmission of all respiratory illnesses, including SARS. Good hygiene is critical in preventing the spread of these kinds of viruses from one person to another. Although the SARS virus will hopefully never be circulating in our community, remembering to practice the following simple measures can considerably reduce your chances of catching similar viruses (like colds and flu) as well as spreading them to someone else:

  • Cover your nose and mouth when you sneeze or cough (preferably into a disposable tissue). Wash your hands thoroughly afterwards.
  • Wash your hands frequently, especially before eating or handling food.
  • Avoid touching your face if your hands are not clean; germs often enter from dirty hands through the mucous membranes of our lips, nose, and eyes.
  • Carry hand sanitizer to clean your hands when soap and water are not available.
  • Enhance your immune system's ability to fight all kinds of infections by eating a healthy, balanced diet, exercising regularly, getting plenty of rest, and avoiding smoking and excessive alcohol.

These recommendations are particularly important if you will be traveling. Often you may encounter variants of germs to which your body may not be completely immune, but practicing good hygiene can go a long way to keeping yourself healthy. Also make sure to check if there is any specific health advice recommended for the places you will be traveling. This may include, for example, advice against drinking the local water, which "shots" may be advisable, or precautions against diseases which may be currently circulating in that area. Every geographical area may have its own health concerns. Educate yourself before you go by checking out the special U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for travelers at www.cdc.gov/travel/. Your doctor may have advice for you as well.

/s/
PETERJOHN D. CAMACHO, MPH

PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF FOOD-BORNE ILLNESS OUTBREAK
Release #2003-50, June 5, 2003

The Director of Public Health and Social Services would like to inform the public of the preliminary results of our investigation involving 7 individuals who reported to the Guam Memorial Hospital Authority on 6/4/03.

The implicated food product for this outbreak is sushi manufactured by Yeong's Manufacturing located in Mangilao. All 7 individuals had purchased and consumed sushi on 6/4/03 at various retail stores.

On 6/5/03, a sanitary inspection of Yeong's Manufacturing located in Mangilao was conducted by a team of public health inspectors. The inspection resulted in a 21 demerit C grade for the following sanitary violations:

1. Thermometers were not provided in every refrigerator and chill unit;
2. Foods were not properly protected in the refrigerator;
3. Refrigerator unit was not located within the food preparation area;
4. Utensils and pots were not stored on clean shelves;
5. Sanitary towels were not provided in the dispenser located next to the hand-washing sink;
6. The toilet facility's ceiling and walls are in need of repair;
7. Single service articles were not properly stored and protected; and
8. Chemical sanitizer test strips were not provided for the sanitizer solution.

Based on the inspection, Yeong's Manufacturing was permitted to remain open for business because a closure was not warranted (41 demerits or more requires closure). However, this establishment will be required to demonstrate that their sushi manufacturing process is acceptable before they are permitted to continue producing this product.

The investigation remains open pending results of laboratory tests. The Department expects to have the results by Monday, 6/9/03.

Consumers are strongly advised to cease purchasing potentially hazardous foods that are not being kept at the proper temperatures. Examples of such foods include sandwiches, sushi, "bento-type" lunch consisting of rice and meat product, kelaguin, lumpia, and empanadas.

Should you have any questions, please contact the Food Safety Program of the Division of Environmental Health at 735-7221.

/s/
PETERJOHN D. CAMACHO, MPH

RENEWAL PERIOD FOR SANITARY PERMITS
Release # 2003-48, May 27, 2003

The Director of Public Health and Social Services would like to inform all health-regulated establishments (i.e. retailers, restaurants, hoteliers, childcare facilities) that the Division of Environmental Health is currently accepting renewal of Sanitary Permits during the hours from 8:00 am - 11:00 am and 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm on Mondays through Fridays.

The following permit holders must provide copies of all required documents listed in their respective category:

CATEGORY I: Eating & Drinking, Food Establisment, Hotel, Tattoo, Laundry/Dry Cleaning, Swimming Pool, Mortuary, Edible Garbage, Commercial Animal Establishment, Massage Parlor, Therapeutic Massage Establishment, Penal Institution, School

1. Application for Sanitary Permit;
2. Business License (expiring 06/30/2004); and
3. Sanitary Permit (expiring 06/30/2003).

CATEGORY II: Barber Shop, Beauty Salon

1. Category I Requirements; and
2. Valid Establishment License (from Board of Cosmetology).

CATEGORY III: Child Care Facility

1. Category I Requirements; and
2. Valid Child Care License (from Bureau of Social Services Administration).


CATEGORY IV: Adult Day Care Center, Nursing Home

1. Category I Requirements; and
2. License to Operate (expiring June 30, 2003).

CATEGORY V: Worker's Dormitory Permit

1. Category I Requirements;
2. Notice of Action (from Territorial Land Use Commission); and
3. Valid Contractor's License.

Please be advised that incomplete applications will not be accepted. All health-regulated establishment operators are strongly encouraged to pick up and complete the Application for Sanitary Permit at the Division of Environmental Health of this Department.

Should you have any questions, please contact the Division of Environmental Health at 735-7221.

/s/
PETERJOHN D. CAMACHO, MPH
Acting

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT SARS (SEVERE ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNDROME) LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY KEY WORD
Revised: April 14, 2003

Q: How many cases of SARS have been reported so far?
A: Visit WHO's SARS page for daily updates on case reports in the United
States and other countries <http://www.who.int>. Most of the cases and deaths have been reported from regions of China. To date no cases meeting WHO or CDC definitions of "suspected" or "probable" SARS have been reported on Guam. As of 4/12/03 there were 2960 SARS cases with 119 deaths reported worldwide.

For case updates, please log-on to:
U.S. - http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/sars.htm
Worldwide - http://www.who.int/csr/sarscountry/en/

Q: What is the cause of SARS?
A: Scientists at CDC and other laboratories have detected a previously
unrecognized coronavirus in patients with SARS. While the new
coronavirus is the leading hypothesis for the cause of SARS, other
viruses are still under investigation as potential causes.

Q: What are coronaviruses?
A: Coronaviruses are a group of viruses that have a halo or crown-like
(corona) appearance when viewed under a microscope. These viruses are a
common cause of mild to moderate upper-respiratory illness in humans and
are associated with respiratory, gastrointestinal, liver and neurologic
disease in animals. Coronaviruses can survive in the environment for up
to three hours.

Q: In what countries is SARS being spread?
A: SARS is currently being spread primarily in a few countries in Southeast Asia (Hong Kong, southern China, Taiwan and Singapore). Although cases of SARS have been reported in many additional countries, in most instances these cases have been the result of travel to Southeast Asia rather than local spread.

Q: What is direct contact?
A: Direct contact means having lived with or cared for a SARS patient or been exposed to the respiratory secretions or body fluids of a SARS infected person.

Q: If I have been exposed to a SARS patient should I stay home from work?
A: Exclusion from duty is not recommended for an exposed health care worker
if they do not have fever or respiratory symptoms; however, the worker
should report any unprotected exposure to SARS patients to their supervisor and should seek medical attention immediately if they develop a fever.

Q: Is SARS a fatal disease?
A: Worldwide about 3-4% of persons known to have contracted SARS have developed serious complications and died. In the U.S., however, there have yet to be any deaths due to SARS reported.

Q: Have there been any SARS cases on Guam?
A: No. There have been 3 reports of suspect cases but all have turned out to be false alarms.

Q: How do I know if I have SARS?
A: You are unlikely to have SARS unless you have traveled to an area in which SARS transmission is occurring within the last 10 days. If you have had such travel and develop a fever and/or cough or difficulty breathing you should seek medical attention immediately.

Q: What should I do if I think I have SARS?
A: If you are ill with a fever of over 100.4°F [>38.0°C] that is
accompanied by a cough or difficulty breathing or that progresses to a
cough and/or difficulty breathing, you should consult a health care
provider. To help your health care provider make a diagnosis, tell him
or her about any recent travel to regions where cases of SARS have been
reported and whether you had direct contact with such a traveler who had these
symptoms.

Q: What is the incubation period of SARS? (If I were exposed to SARS, how long would it take me to become sick?)
A: The incubation period for SARS is typically 2-7 days; however, isolated
reports have suggested an incubation period as long as 10 days (this is the reason that persons with direct contact to a SARS patient may be quarantined for 10 days). The symptoms of SARS usually begin with a fever of 100.4°F or higher(>38.0°C) (see signs and symptoms, above).

Q: How long is a person with SARS infectious to others (What is the period of communicability)?
A: Information to date suggests that people are most likely to be
infectious only after they have developed symptoms, such as fever or cough. However, it is still not known for sure how long before or after their symptoms begin that patients with SARS might be able to transmit the disease to others.

Q: Will wearing a disposable mask prevent SARS infection?
A: Common disposable "surgical" masks may offer some protection to incidental exposure to SARS but persons caring for SARS patients should be supplied with a fit-tested N95 mask, disposable gloves and gown, and eye protection (persons wearing eye glasses are considered to have adequate eye protection).

Q: What has CDC recommended to prevent transmission of SARS in homes in which a SARS case has been placed in isolation?
A: CDC has developed interim infection control recommendations available at
http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/sars/ic-closecontacts.htm for patients with
suspected SARS in the household. The basic precautions outlined in this
document include the following:

* Infection control precautions should be continued for SARS
patients for 10 days after respiratory symptoms and fever are
gone. SARS patients should limit interactions outside the home and
should not go to work, school, out-of-home day care, or other
public areas during the 10-day period.
* During this 10-day period, all members of the household with a
SARS patient should carefully follow recommendations for hand
hygiene, such as frequent hand washing or the use of alcohol-based
hand rubs.
* Each patient with SARS should cover his or her mouth and nose with
a tissue before sneezing or coughing. If possible, a person
recovering from SARS should wear a surgical mask during close
contact with uninfected persons. If the patient is unable to wear
a surgical mask, other people in the home should wear one when in
close contact with the patient.
* Disposable gloves should be considered for any contact with body
fluids from a SARS patient. However, immediately after activities
involving contact with body fluids, gloves should be removed and
discarded, and hands should be washed. Gloves should not be washed
or reused, and are not intended to replace proper hand hygiene.
* SARS patients should avoid sharing eating utensils, towels, and
bedding with other members of the household, although these items
can be used by others after routine cleaning, such as washing or
laundering with soap and hot water.
* Common household cleaners are sufficient for disinfecting toilets,
sinks, and other surfaces touched by patients with SARS, but the
cleaners must be used frequently.
* Other members of the household need not restrict their outside
activities unless they develop symptoms of SARS, such as a fever
or respiratory illness.


Q: What is Public Health doing to prevent SARS from becoming a problem on Guam?
A: Although there is probably no way to prevent a case of SARS eventually finding its way to Guam unless the island is closed to all travel, the Guam Department of Public Health and Social Services is taking the following steps to minimize this risk:

* Health Alert notices are being provided to passengers arriving from areas where SARS is currently being spread.
* Airline employees are required to report ill passengers upon arrival.
* Guam Customs & Quarantine officers report ill passengers to Public Health.
* Timely information is being provided to doctors and the public.
* Persons with close contact with SARS patients will be required to be quarantined for 10 days.
* Infection control practices at GMH have been reviewed and strengthened.

Q: What does a quarantine inspector do?
A: Customs and Quarantine inspectors serve as important guardians of health at borders and ports of entry into the United States. They routinely respond to
Reports of illness in arriving passengers and ensure that the appropriate medical action is taken.

Q: Who is most at risk of contracting SARS?
A: At this time only people who have traveled to areas where SARS is being spread (Southeast Asia) and close contact of SARS cases are at risk of contracting SARS. New cases of SARS continue to be reported primarily among people who have had direct close contact with an infected person, such as those sharing a household with a SARS patient and health care workers who did not use
infection control procedures while caring for a SARS patient. In the
United States, there is no indication of community transmission at this
time. CDC continues to monitor this situation very closely.

Q: What is the risk to individuals who may have shared a plane or boat trip
with a suspected SARS patient?
A: Cases of SARS continue to be reported primarily among persons who have
had direct close contact with an infected person, such as those sharing
a household with a SARS patient and health care workers who did not use
infection control procedures while attending to a SARS patient. A few cases of SARS have also occurred among air travelers, primarily travelers to and from Hong Kong, Hanoi, Singapore, and mainland China.

Q: What is SARS?
A: SARS is a viral respiratory illness similar to influenza that has recently been reported in Southeast Asia, North America, and Europe. Although cases have been reported in many countries, it is being spread primarily in Hong Kong, southern China, Taipei and Singapore. The full name is Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. "Suspect" SARS is defined as fever, respiratory symptoms (cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing) and a history of travel within 10 days to an area where SARS is being transmitted. "Probable" SARS is the above plus the development of more serious respiratory disease (pneumonia or Acute Respiratory Distress).

Q: How is SARS spread?
A: The principal way SARS appears to be spread is through droplet
transmission; namely, when someone sick with SARS coughs or sneezes
droplets into the air and someone else breathes them in. It is also possible
that SARS can be transmitted more broadly through the air or from
objects that have become contaminated but these means of spread are apparently much less common.

Q: Is it safe to use a public swimming pool during a SARS outbreak?
A: It is probably not possible for SARS to be transmitted by contact with water in a public swimming pool. Direct contact with the respiratory secretions, body fluids or waste products of a SARS infected person is usually required for transmission.

Q: What are the symptoms of SARS?
A: The illness usually begins with a fever (measured temperature greater
than 100.4°F [>38.0°C]). The fever is sometimes associated with chills
or other symptoms, including headache, general feeling of discomfort,
and body aches. Some people also experience mild respiratory symptoms at
the outset.

After 2 to 7 days, SARS patients may develop a dry, nonproductive cough
that might be accompanied by or progress to the point where insufficient
oxygen is getting to the blood. In 10% to 20% of cases, patients will
require mechanical ventilation.

Q: Is SARS caused by terrorists?
A: Information currently available about SARS indicates that people who
appear to be most at risk are either health care workers taking care of
sick people or family members or household contacts of those who are
infected with SARS. That pattern of transmission is what would typically
be expected in a contagious respiratory or flu-like illness and is not what would be expected as the result of a terrorist attack.

Q: Is there a test for SARS?
A: No "test" is available yet for SARS; however, CDC, in collaboration with WHO and other laboratories, has developed 2 research tests that appear to be very promising in detecting antibodies to the new coronavirus. CDC is working to refine and share this testing capability as soon as possible with laboratories across the United States and internationally.

Q: I have to travel to an area where SARS transmission has been reported. What precautions should I take?
A: There are no specific measures such as vaccines or medications that can be taken to prevent SARS infection. If you are unable to delay your travel plans you should plan to avoid crowds and maintain your body's resistance to disease by getting adequate rest, proper diet and moderate exercise. Frequent hand washing will also help minimize your chances of contracting SARS and other diseases.

Q: Are there any travel restrictions related to SARS?
A: At this time there are no travel restrictions in place that are directly
related to SARS. However, a CDC travel advisory recommends that individuals who are planning nonessential or elective travel to mainland China, Hong Kong, Hanoi, Vietnam, or Singapore may wish to postpone their trip until further notice.

Q: What should I do if I have recently traveled to a country where cases of
SARS have been reported?
A: You should monitor your own health for 10 days following your return. If
you become ill with a fever of over 100.4°F [>38.0°C] that is accompanied by a cough or difficulty breathing or that progresses to a cough and/or difficulty breathing, you should consult a health care provider. To help your health care provider make a diagnosis, tell him or her about any recent travel to regions where cases of SARS have been reported and whether you were in contact with someone who had these symptoms

Q: What medical treatment is recommended for patients with SARS?
A: CDC currently recommends that patients with SARS receive the same treatment that would be used for any patient with serious community-acquired atypical pneumonia of unknown cause. Several treatment regimens have been used for patients with SARS, but there is insufficient information at this time to determine if they have had a beneficial effect. Reported therapeutic regimens have included antibiotics to presumptively treat known bacterial agents of atypical pneumonia. Therapy also has included antiviral agents such as
oseltamivir or ribavirin. Steroids also have been administered orally or
intravenously to patients in combination with ribavirin and other
antimicrobials.

Q: Is there a vaccination against SARS?
A: No, but scientists will soon be working to develop one.

DPHSS AWARDED FEDERAL GRANT FOR BREAST & CERVICAL CANCER EARLY DETECTION PROGRAM
Release #2003-12, November 26, 2002

Mr. Dennis Rodriguez, Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS), announces that the Department has been awarded a $378,984 federal grant for Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (BCCEDP) under the National Cancer Prevention and Control Program of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The program is approved for five years from September 30, 2002 through June 29, 2007. Its primary goal is to reduce deaths from breast and cervical cancer by providing free screening and diagnostic services to qualified women.

The program offers free breast & cervical screening (clinical breast exams, mammograms, pelvic exams, Pap tests/smears) and diagnostic services to qualified women 35-64 years of age, who do not have health insurance or who may have health insurance but do not get screening done because they cannot afford the deductible/co-payment, or their health insurance does not cover the screening. To enroll in the program or to get more information, please call the Department's BCCEDP at 635-7505/7506 or Medical Social Services (MSS) at 735-7174/7168.


/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


RELOCATION OF THE INDIVIDUAL & FAMILY GRANT (IFG) PROGRAM OFFICE
Release #2003-11, November 15, 2002

Mr. DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ, Director, Department of Public Health and Social Services, announces the relocation of the IFG Program Office from the R.J. Bordallo Governor's Complex, Hagatna to Suite 103, Public Health Building, Mangilao effective November 19, 2002 (Tuesday).

In addition, effective Tuesday, November 19, 2002, all IFG checks will be mailed to the address provided to FEMA by the applicant.

All interested or concerned parties can contact the IFG Program Office at 735-7125 or 735-7172 during the hours of 8 a.m. to 12 noon and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays, beginning Tuesday, November 19, 2002.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


RECALL OF "POWDERED INFANT FORMULA"
Release #2003-10, November 14, 2002

DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ, the Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services, would like to inform the public of the recall of certain lots of powdered infant formula that were manufactured between July 12 and September 25, 2002 by Wyeth Nutritional, Inc. The voluntary recall by the manufacturer was made because the affected products may be contaminated with Enterobacter sakazakii.

Enterobacter sakazakii is a food-borne pathogen that can in rare cases cause sepsis (bacteria in the blood), meningitis (inflammation of the lining of the brain), or necrotizing enterocolitis (severe intestinal infection) in newborn infants, particularly premature infants or other infants with weakened immune systems.

The powdered infant formula was distributed nationwide in retain stores. The affected products can be identified by an expiration/use by date embossed on the bottom of the can with the following dates: "7 28 05", "08 28 05" and "09 28 05". A six-digit character embossed on the bottom of the cans can also be used to identify the affected products. The first four characters include: "K12N" through "K19N", "L07N" through "L30N"; and "N03N" through "N25N".

The products include:

Baby Basics by Albertson's Infant Formula with Iron 2 LB (908g)
Baby Basics by Albertson's Infant Formula with Iron 1 LB (454g)
Baby Basics by Albertson's Soy Infant Formula with Iron 2 LB (908g)
Baby Basics by Albertson's Soy Infant Formula with Iron 1 LB (454g)
Baby Basics by Albertson's Formula for older infants with Iron 1 LB 15.7 oz (900g)

Kozy Kids Infant Formula with Iron 16 oz (454g)
Kozy Kids Soy Infant Formula with Iron 16 oz (454g)

CVX Soy Infant Formula with Iron 16 oz (454g)

Hill Country Fare Infant Formula with Iron 32 oz (LB) 908g
Hill Country Fare Infant Formula with Iron 16 oz (1 LB) 454g
Hill Country Fare Soy Infant Formula with Iron 32 oz (2 LB) 908g
Hill Country Fare Soy Infant Formula with Iron 16 oz (1 LB) 454g

HEB Baby Infant Formula with Iron 32 oz (2 LB) 908g

American Fare Little Ones Infant Formula with Iron 2 LB (908g)
American Fare Little Ones Soy Infant Formula with Iron 2 LB (908g)
American Fare Little Ones Formula for Older Infants with Iron & Calcium 1 LB 15.5 (900g)

HomeBest Soy Infant Formula with Iron 2 LB (908g)

Safeway Select Infant Formula with Iron 2 LB (908g)
Safeway Select Infant Formula 2 1 LB 15.7 oz (900g)

Healthy Baby Infant Formula with Iron 2 LB (908g)
Healthy Baby Infant Formula with Iron 1 LB (454g)
Healthy Baby Soy Infant Formula with Iron 2 LB (908g)
Healthy Baby Formula for Older Infants with Iron 1 LB 15.7 oz (900g)

Walgreens Infant Formula with Iron 16 oz (454g)

Parent's Choice Infant Formula with Iron 2 LB (908g)
Parent's Choice Infant Formula with Iron 16 oz (454g)
Parent's Choice Soy Infant Formula with Iron 2 LB (908g)
Parent's Choice Soy Infant Formula with Iron 35 oz (1g)
Parent's Choice 1 infant Formula with Iron 1 LB 15.7 oz (900g)

For any questions regarding this matter, please contact the Food Safety Program at the Division of Environmental Health at 735-7221.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


LICENSING OF BARBERS AND BARBER ESTABLISHMENTS
Release #2003-09, November 7, 2002

DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ, Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services, announces that the Guam Board of Barbering and Cosmetology has extended the deadline to submit an application to be "grandfathered" as a barber to December 31, 2002. There will be no exceptions for late submissions.

Public Law 25-188, "An Act to Repeal and Reenact Chapter 18 of Title 10 of the Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Licensing of Cosmetology and Cosmetological Establishments and Barbers and Barber Establishments" requires that barbers practicing on Guam must be licensed by the Guam Board of Barbering and Cosmetology. Barbers who have been practicing prior to January 11, 2001 may apply to be "grandfathered" in provided all requirements are met. Barbers who practiced after January 11, 2001 must meet the requirements as set forth by the Board. Barber establishments must also be licensed.

Applications can be picked up at the Health Professional Licensing Office located at 651 Legacy Square Commercial Complex, South Route 10 in Mangilao between the hours of 8 a.m. - 12 noon and 1 - 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays. For further information, please contact the Guam Board of Barbering and Cosmetology at 735-7406.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


ADDITIONAL TELEPHONE NUMBERS FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONAL LICENSING OFFICE
Release #2003-08, November 7, 2002

The Department of Public Health and Social Services wishes to announce that the Health Professional Licensing Office has additional telephone numbers. The office can be contacted at 735-7406/07/08 and the facsimile number is 7357413.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


ADULT IMMUNIZATION OUTREACH CLINIC
Release #2003-07, October 22, 2002

The Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services announces an Adult Immunization Outreach Clinic on Saturday. November 9, 2002, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Micronesia Mall. Free Influenza (flu) shots will be offered for older adults, 50 years of age and older. The public is asked to bring a photo-ID and their most recent immunization shot record (if available).

For more information, please call DPHSS Immunization Program at 735-7143.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


CHILD CARE RESOURCE
Release #2003-06, October 22, 2002

The Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services announces that intake for new applications for child care assistance under the Chile Care and Development Funds (CCDF) is closed.

Should you have any questions, please call DPHSS/DPW/Work Programs Section at 735-7256.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


SYPHILIS
Release #2003-05, October 22, 2002

The Guam Department of Public Health and Social Services recorded a total of 59 syphilis cases from January 2001 to present. A total of 42 cases were reported in 2001 and 17 cases, so far, were reported in 2002. Of the 59 cases, 16 were infectious cases amongst individuals who identify as heterosexual, and I was a presumptive congenital syphilis case (resulting in neonatal death).

Syphilis is a curable infection caused by a bacterium called Treponema pallidum, primarily a sexually transmitted disease. The first sign of syphilis is usually a sore (called a chancre), that is painless and appears at the site of the initial contact. It may be accompanied by swollen glands, which develop within a week after the appearance of the initial sore. The sore will last from one to five weeks, and will disappear by itself even if no treatment is received. Approximately six weeks after the sore first appears, a person will enter the second stage of the disease. The most common symptom during this stage is rash, which may appear on any part of the body. After the second stage of the disease, the only way syphilis can be detected is through a blood test, although secondary symptoms may occasionally recur.

The Department of Public Health and Social Services' Bureau of Communicable Disease Control encourages all persons who have any signs and symptoms of syphilis to contact their primary care physician or the STD/HIV Prevention Program for further information at 735-7137 or 734-2437. Furthermore, we encourage all private physicians to refer confirmed or suspect cases of syphilis to Public Health immediately.

Please reference the attached Fact Sheet on Syphilis. If you have any questions, contact Baltazar Aguon, STD/HIV Health Educator at 735-7311. For additional information on syphilis, contact the CDC National STD/AIDS Hotline at 1-800-342-2437 / 227-8922, or visit the American Social Health Association website at: http://www.ashadtd.org/stdfaqs.syphilis.html

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


HEALTH PROFESSIONAL LICENSING OFFICE RELOCATION NOTICE
Released October 1, 2002

The Department of Public Health and Social Services wishes to announce that the Health Professional Licensing Office has relocated from 1304 East Sunset Boulevard, Tiyan to 651 Legacy Square Commercial Complex, Suite 9 in Mangilao. Their new telephone numbers are 735-7406/10.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


CHANGE OF MEDICAL RECORDS' HOURS OF OPERATION
Released September 20, 2002

Dennis G. Rodriguez, Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services, announces that effective September 27, 2002, the Medical Records Section (Mangilao Facility) will adjust hours of operations as follows in order to meet critical service demands:

1. Medical Records Window Service
  - Monday through Friday
    - 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (Noon)
    - 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
  - Friday
    - 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (Noon)
 
2. Clinic appointment scheduling via telephone will be from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. daily.

For further information, please call Medical Records at 735-7140 or 7169.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


FLUSHING OF PIPING SYSTEM AFTER THE LIFTING OF THE BOIL-WATER NOTICE
Released September 17, 2002

Dennis G. Rodriguez, Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services, would like to inform all health regulated-establishments that appropriate actions must still be taken even though the boil-water notice have been lifted. Because many faucets and beverage dispensing devices, such as soda dispensing machines, water fountains, and ice-making machines, had been sealed-off for many weeks during the boil-water notice, there is the possibility that contaminated water may still be present in the pipes of each establishment.

The Department advises the establishments to flush-out their plumbing system by continuously running their water for a minimum of 30 to 45 minutes and then follow the manufacturers' guideline for sanitizing their beverage or ice dispensing equipments. If establishments wish to obtain confirmation in the absence of coliform bacteria in their system after the flushing, they may contact the University of Guam's Water and Environmental Research Institute for possible water analysis.

The yellow tagging tapes that were placed by this Department to seal the many faucets and beverage dispensing machines at many of the establishments may be removed to conduct the flushing of the system.

For any questions in this matter, please contact the Division of Environmental Health at 735-7221.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


LICENSING OF BARBERS AND BARBER ESTABLISHMENTS
Released August 21, 2002

DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ, Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services, announces that the Guam Board of Barbering and Cosmetology has extended the deadline to submit an application to be "grandfathered" as a barber to December 31, 2002. There will be no exceptions for late submissions.

Public Law 25-188, "An Act to Repeal and Reenact Chapter 18 of Title 10 of the Guam Code Annotated, Relative to Licensing of Cosmetology and Cosmetological Establishments and Barbers and Barber Establishments" requires that barbers practicing on Guam must be licensed by the Guam Board of Barbering and Cosmetology. Barbers who have been practicing prior to January 11, 2001 may apply to be "grandfathered" in provided all requirements are met. Barbers who practiced after January 11, 2001 must meet the requirements as set forth by the Board. Barber establishments must also be licensed.

Applications can be picked up at the Health Professional Licensing Office located at 1304 East Sunset Boulevard, Tiyan between the hours of 8 a.m. - 12 noon and 1 - 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays. For further information, please contact the Guam Board of Barbering and Cosmetology at 475-0251/2.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


DRINKING WATER WARNING (BOIL WATER NOTICE)
PRESS RELEASE dated July 19, 2002

GIL A. SHINOHARA, Acting General Manager of Guam Waterworks Authority (GWA), DAVID W. LONGA, Acting Administrator of the Guam Environmental Protection Agency, and DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ, Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services (DPHSS), would like to inform the public that the island-wide boil water notice remains in effect until further notice.

This notice remains in effect due to possible contamination within the island-wide water distribution with a potentially disease-causing microorganisms as a result of problems related to Typhoons Chata'an and Halong. Test results of water samples collected at various sites from July 7 to 15, 2002 within the distribution system indicated a presence of total coliforms. Raw water samples collected at various producing wells prior to chlorination indicated presence of total and fecal coliforms.

Fecal coliforms and E. coli are bacteria whose presence indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. Microbes in these wastes can cause diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. They may pose a special risk for infants, young children, and people with severely compromised immune systems.

The symptoms above are not caused only by organisms in drinking water. If you experience these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care provider.

Bacterial contamination can occur when storm run-off (following heavy rains) enters the drinking water source. It can also happen due to breaks in the distribution system (pipes) or a failure in the water treatment process.

The public is assured that island-wide assessments are being conducted. GWA is activating more wells and chlorination systems are being repaired or installed. Water samples are being taken to ensure that your water supply is safe to consume. We will inform you when tests no longer detect bacteria in the water supply.

The Departments are strongly recommending that the public boil or disinfect their water before consuming it. This does not include commercially bottled water that comes from an approved source. Water may be treated by one of the following methods:

1. Bring all water to a vigorous boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using; or

2. Disinfect water using "normal strength" common household bleach. Normal strength bleach contains approximately 5.25% available chlorine. Instructions for disinfection can normally be found on the label. For clear-looking water, use one teaspoon of normal strength bleach for 10 gallons of water. For dirty-looking water, use one teaspoon of normal strength bleach for 5 gallons of water. After adding the chlorine bleach, the water should be mixed thoroughly and be allowed to stand for at least 30 minutes (longer if possible).

After 30 minutes, the water should still have a slight chlorine odor. If no smell is noted, repeat the dosage and allow the water to stand an additional 15 minutes.

If the treated water has a strong chlorine taste, it can be made more palatable by allowing it to stand exposed to the air for a few hours or by pouring it from one clean container to another several times (this will allow some of the chlorine to dissipate).

All sanitized water should be stored in clean, tightly covered containers that are pre-rinsed with bleach solution before refilling the containers.

What about hotels, restaurants, child-care centers and other health-regulated establishments?

The boil water notice applies to all such establishments. Restaurants or other businesses operating their own private water treatment systems can contact DPHSS or GEPA to request an exemption from this notice. Exemptions will only be issued after tests from certified laboratory confirm that treatment systems are producing potable water.

The only certified laboratory for water testing is the University of Guam's Water & Environment Research Institute (WERI). For more information, please contact Mr. Rick Wood at 735-2688.

What is the difference between potable and non-potable water?

· Potable water meets the national drinking water standards and can be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation and cooking.
· Non-potable water does not meet the national drinking water standards and should not be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation and cooking. REASON: It may be contaminated with bacteria and other organisms.

As a precaution, the public should consider all running water in homes and businesses as non-potable water. The only exception is bottled water coming from certified laboratory tested approved source. Such bottled water is considered potable water and safe.

For more information, please contact Mr. Angel Marquez of Guam EPA Safe Drinking Water Division at 475-1661, Ms. Carmen Sian-Denton of Guam Waterworks Authority Laboratory Support Services at 632-9697, or Ms. Rosanna Rabago of the Department of Public Health and Social Services' Division of Environmental Health at 735-7221.


/s/
DAVID W. LONGA
Acting Administrator, Guam EPA


/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director, DPHSS


/s/
GIL A. SHINOHARA
Acting General Manager, GWA


TYPHOON CHATA'AN EMERGENCY FOOD STAMP PROGRAM
Released July 24, 2002

Dennis G. Rodriguez, Director, Department of Public Health and Social Services, announces that Guam's request for an extension to Guam's Typhoon Chata'an Emergency Food Stamp Program has been approved. Guam residents who are not regular food stamp recipients now have until 8:00 p.m. Friday, July 26 to apply at one of the three Disaster Assistance Centers for the food stamp assistance. Operations for the Bank of Guam issuance outlets will also be extended to Friday, July 26 from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. The number of sites, however, will be reduced to four: Yigo, Hafa Adai Market; Tamuning, Cost-U-Less; Barrigada Heights, Price Smart; and the Merizo Community Center.

Regular food stamp recipients have until July 31, 2002 to request for replacement coupons for food lost due to the typhoon. Because most certification staff are currently assigned to the three Disaster Assistance Centers, regular clients are advised that replacement coupons will be more efficiently processed beginning Monday, July 29, when the Emergency Food Stamp Program has concluded and certification staff have returned to their normal duties.

Approximately 2,000 regular food stamp households who did not receive the maximum allotment for their household size in July are advised that an Over the Counter (OTC) authorization document for the difference has been prepared and is available for pick up at their regular certification center Monday through Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. until July 31, 2002. Again, distribution of these OTCs will be more efficient upon the return of certification staff from the Disaster Assistance Centers on Monday, July 29.

Applicants for Emergency Food Stamps are reminded that applications are being
keyed into a database for computer matching to detect duplicate participation. Over issued benefits must be repaid and persons found guilty of intentional program violations will be subject to fines and/or prosecution as well as disqualification from the Food Stamp Program. Quality Control Reviewers are currently investigating randomly selected cases, as well as reports of possible fraud against the program. If you believe that you have received more food stamps than you are eligible for, or if you suspect someone has abused or defrauded the program, you are encouraged to contact the DPHSS Investigation and Recoupment Office (IRO) at 735-5342 (KEHA).

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


SANITATION GUIDELINES FOR HEALTH REGULATED ESTABLISHMENTS DURING WATER OUTAGES AND LOW WATER PRESSURE
Released July 12, 2002

DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ, Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services would like to advise all eating & drinking establishments (i.e. restaurants, caterers, food booths) and food establishments (i.e. retail stores, supermarkets, warehouses, cold storage facilities) of the following directive to ensure health and safety for the public:

If there is no adequately running, potable water, all health regulated establishments are to cease all operation. However, exceptions may be made for establishments which have an alternate source or means of obtaining, and using, potable water for their facility. Establishments with low water pressure are expected to boil their water before use since the quality of the water may have been compromised. Restaurant operators are advised that at no time should any customer be permitted to dine in the facility when there is no running water. In these cases, restaurant operations shall be limited to servicing meals for carry out only.

All owners and managers of eating and drinking establishments and food establishments are urged to take precautionary measures to ensure that their food supplies are not compromised, with particular emphasis on basic sanitation and good personal hygiene practices.

The public is further advised to take precaution when visiting any eating, drinking, and food-related establishments located in areas with no water, or low water pressure.

Other Related Tips:

Water Disinfection

Tap water used for food preparation and cooking should be properly disinfected by using one of the following methods: 1) Boiling it vigorously for one minute or 2) Chlorine Treatment (One tablespoon for 5 gallons of water).

· Water to be used for drinking, cooking, making any prepared drink, should be properly disinfected using the methods described above.
· All sanitized water should be stored in clean, tightly covered containers.
· Containers for water should be rinsed with a bleach solution before re-using them.

Back-up Water Supply

A back-up supply of potable water (i.e. 50 gallon container of water) should be obtained from an approved source in the event that water service is interrupted. The back-up water should be of sufficient amount to service the establishment while in operation, including restroom facilities.

If you are unsure whether your food is safe and wholesome for consumption, please call the Bureau of Inspection and Enforcement of the Division of Environmental Health at 735-7221.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


SANITARY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE PUBLIC
Released July 12, 2002

DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ, Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services would like to remind the public of the following tips to prevent food-borne illness and ensure basic sanitation:

Water Disinfection:

With the Guam Environmental Protection Agency and Guam Waterworks Authority issuing an island-wide boiling notice for Guam, this Department highly recommends that the public disinfect their water regardless whether the water appears to be safe for consumption.

Tap water used for food preparation and cooking should be properly disinfected by using one of the following methods: 1) Boiling it vigorously for one minute or 2) Chlorine Treatment (One tablespoon bleach for 5 gallons of water).

· Water to be used for drinking, cooking, making any prepared drink, or brushing the teeth should be properly disinfected using the methods described above.
· All sanitized water should be stored in clean, tightly covered containers.
· Containers for water should be clean and rinsed with a bleach solution before re-using them. This will prevent any contamination.

Preventing Food-Borne Illnesses:

1. Practice good personal hygiene. One important thing to remember is to always wash your hands vigorously with soap and clean water. Wash your hands frequently, especially after using the toilet, handling raw food, coughing or sneezing, smoking, handling soiled, dirty items (i.e. trash, laundry).

2. Keep the following table (as listed below) in mind when cleaning out your refrigerator and freezer of all food products. Whenever you are not sure whether your food is safe, it is better to discard it.

FROZEN FOOD Food still cold, held at 40ºF or above under 2 hours Held above 40ºF for over 2 hours
Beef, Pork, Poultry, and Ground Meats Refreeze Discard
Variety meats (liver, kidney, heart, chitterlings) Refreeze Discard
Casseroles, stews, soups, convenience foods, pizza Refreeze Discard
Fish, shellfish, breaded seafood products Refreeze, However there will be some texture and flavor loss. Discard
Milk, Eggs (out of shell) & egg products Refreeze Discard
Cheese (soft & semi-soft), cream cheese, Ricotta, Hard Cheeses Refreeze Discard
Juices (Fruit, vegetable) Refreeze Discard if moldy, yeasty smell, slimy and if held for 6 hours or more.
Cakes, pies, pastries with custard and cheese filling, pie crust, commercial and handmade bread dough Refreeze Discard
REFRIGERATOR FOOD Food still cold, held at 40ºF or above under 2 hours Held above 40ºF for over 2 hours
Milk, cream, sour cream, yogurt Safe Discard
Butter, margarine Safe Safe
Baby formula (opened) Safe Discard
Eggs, fresh hard-cooked in shell Safe Discard
Hard cheeses, processed cheese Safe Safe
Soft cheeses, cottage cheese Safe Discard
Fruit juice (opened), Canned juice (opened) Safe Safe
Vegetables, cooked vegetable juice Safe Discard after 6 hours or when it turns moldy or has an unusual odor or look
Meat and meat products Safe Discard
Fruit juices, pies Safe Discard
Bread, rolls, cakes, muffins, quick breads Safe Safe
Refrigerator dough Safe Discard
Cooked pasta Safe Discard

3. Any foods that have been exposed to direct contact with flood waters should be disposed. Paper cellophane or plastic wrapped goods can trap bacteria and filth in seams and splits and are virtually impossible to clean.

4. Foods with screw tops, crimped caps, corks that came in contact with flood waters should also be destroyed.


5. Intact, sealed canned goods may be salvaged for human consumption be removing all labels and cleaning filthy from the surface by scrubbing with hot soapy water. Rinse with clean water and sanitize by immersing the cans in a solution of one cup bleach in 5 gallons of water for 90 seconds. Air-dry the can or wipe dry with a clean cloth to prevent rusting or leaks. Relabel all cans before returning them to storage.

Should you have any questions, please contact the Division of Environmental Health at 735-7221.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


TYPHOON CHATA'AN ANNOUNCEMENT
PRESS RELEASE NO: 2002-56 dated July 11, 2002

The Department of Public Health & Social Services encourages the public to utilize their respective village Mayor's Office as a point of contact to register any injury or damages they sustained due to Typhoon Chata'an.

Registration at the Mayor's Office does not mean you are automatically registered with FEMA. As the Individual Family Grant assistance become available, locations of the disaster centers will be communicated to the public.

As a reminder please do not register with your Mayor's Office if you did not sustain any injury or damages.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


SANITATION GUIDELINES FOR HEALTH REGULATED ESTABLISHMENTS DURING WATER OUTAGES AND LOW WATER PRESSURE
Released July 12, 2002

DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ, Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services would like to advise all eating & drinking establishments (i.e. restaurants, caterers, food booths) and food establishments (i.e. retail stores, supermarkets, warehouses, cold storage facilities) of the following directive to ensure health and safety for the public:

If there is no adequately running, potable water, all health regulated establishments are to cease all operation. However, exceptions may be made for establishments which have an alternate source or means of obtaining, and using, potable water for their facility. Establishments with low water pressure are expected to boil their water before use since the quality of the water may have been compromised. Restaurant operators are advised that at no time should any customer be permitted to dine in the facility when there is no running water. In these cases, restaurant operations shall be limited to servicing meals for carry out only.

All owners and managers of eating and drinking establishments and food establishments are urged to take precautionary measures to ensure that their food supplies are not compromised, with particular emphasis on basic sanitation and good personal hygiene practices.

The public is further advised to take precaution when visiting any eating, drinking, and food-related establishments located in areas with no water, or low water pressure.

Other Related Tips:

Water Disinfection

Tap water used for food preparation and cooking should be properly disinfected by using one of the following methods: 1) Boiling it vigorously for one minute or 2) Chlorine Treatment (One tablespoon for 5 gallons of water).

· Water to be used for drinking, cooking, making any prepared drink, should be properly disinfected using the methods described above.
· All sanitized water should be stored in clean, tightly covered containers.
· Containers for water should be rinsed with a bleach solution before re-using them.

Back-up Water Supply

A back-up supply of potable water (i.e. 50 gallon container of water) should be obtained from an approved source in the event that water service is interrupted. The back-up water should be of sufficient amount to service the establishment while in operation, including restroom facilities.

If you are unsure whether your food is safe and wholesome for consumption, please call the Bureau of Inspection and Enforcement of the Division of Environmental Health at 735-7221.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


SANITARY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE PUBLIC
Released July 12, 2002

DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ, Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services would like to remind the public of the following tips to prevent food-borne illness and ensure basic sanitation:

Water Disinfection:

With the Guam Environmental Protection Agency and Guam Waterworks Authority issuing an island-wide boiling notice for Guam, this Department highly recommends that the public disinfect their water regardless whether the water appears to be safe for consumption.

Tap water used for food preparation and cooking should be properly disinfected by using one of the following methods: 1) Boiling it vigorously for one minute or 2) Chlorine Treatment (One tablespoon bleach for 5 gallons of water).

· Water to be used for drinking, cooking, making any prepared drink, or brushing the teeth should be properly disinfected using the methods described above.
· All sanitized water should be stored in clean, tightly covered containers.
· Containers for water should be clean and rinsed with a bleach solution before re-using them. This will prevent any contamination.

Preventing Food-Borne Illnesses:

1. Practice good personal hygiene. One important thing to remember is to always wash your hands vigorously with soap and clean water. Wash your hands frequently, especially after using the toilet, handling raw food, coughing or sneezing, smoking, handling soiled, dirty items (i.e. trash, laundry).

2. Keep the following table (as listed below) in mind when cleaning out your refrigerator and freezer of all food products. Whenever you are not sure whether your food is safe, it is better to discard it.

FROZEN FOOD Food still cold, held at 40ºF or above under 2 hours Held above 40ºF for over 2 hours
Beef, Pork, Poultry, and Ground Meats Refreeze Discard
Variety meats (liver, kidney, heart, chitterlings) Refreeze Discard
Casseroles, stews, soups, convenience foods, pizza Refreeze Discard
Fish, shellfish, breaded seafood products Refreeze, However there will be some texture and flavor loss. Discard
Milk, Eggs (out of shell) & egg products Refreeze Discard
Cheese (soft & semi-soft), cream cheese, Ricotta, Hard Cheeses Refreeze Discard
Juices (Fruit, vegetable) Refreeze Discard if moldy, yeasty smell, slimy and if held for 6 hours or more.
Cakes, pies, pastries with custard and cheese filling, pie crust, commercial and handmade bread dough Refreeze Discard
REFRIGERATOR FOOD Food still cold, held at 40ºF or above under 2 hours Held above 40ºF for over 2 hours
Milk, cream, sour cream, yogurt Safe Discard
Butter, margarine Safe Safe
Baby formula (opened) Safe Discard
Eggs, fresh hard-cooked in shell Safe Discard
Hard cheeses, processed cheese Safe Safe
Soft cheeses, cottage cheese Safe Discard
Fruit juice (opened), Canned juice (opened) Safe Safe
Vegetables, cooked vegetable juice Safe Discard after 6 hours or when it turns moldy or has an unusual odor or look
Meat and meat products Safe Discard
Fruit juices, pies Safe Discard
Bread, rolls, cakes, muffins, quick breads Safe Safe
Refrigerator dough Safe Discard
Cooked pasta Safe Discard

3. Any foods that have been exposed to direct contact with flood waters should be disposed. Paper cellophane or plastic wrapped goods can trap bacteria and filth in seams and splits and are virtually impossible to clean.

4. Foods with screw tops, crimped caps, corks that came in contact with flood waters should also be destroyed.


5. Intact, sealed canned goods may be salvaged for human consumption be removing all labels and cleaning filthy from the surface by scrubbing with hot soapy water. Rinse with clean water and sanitize by immersing the cans in a solution of one cup bleach in 5 gallons of water for 90 seconds. Air-dry the can or wipe dry with a clean cloth to prevent rusting or leaks. Relabel all cans before returning them to storage.

Should you have any questions, please contact the Division of Environmental Health at 735-7221.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


TYPHOON CHATA'AN ANNOUNCEMENT
PRESS RELEASE NO: 2002-56 dated July 11, 2002

The Department of Public Health & Social Services encourages the public to utilize their respective village Mayor's Office as a point of contact to register any injury or damages they sustained due to Typhoon Chata'an.

Registration at the Mayor's Office does not mean you are automatically registered with FEMA. As the Individual Family Grant assistance become available, locations of the disaster centers will be communicated to the public.

As a reminder please do not register with your Mayor's Office if you did not sustain any injury or damages.

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


SEVENTH ANNUAL NATIONAL HIV TESTING DAY
Posted June 26, 2002

The Guam Department of Public Health and Social Services encourages the community of Guam to participate in the 7th annual National HIV Testing Day on Thursday, June 27. This event is part of an ongoing effort to promote testing for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

The local theme is "Direct your Future, Know your Status". The goal is to encourage people to learn if they are infected so that they can take control of their lives by seeking appropriate treatment and preventing the spread of HIV. Also for those testing HIV negative, to reinforce safer behaviors such as abstinence, monogamy, protected sex, and the use of clean needles.

Testing will be available on Thursday, June 27th from 8:00am to 4:30pm a Central Public Health, Mangilao room 156A. Please refer to the National HIV Testing Day website at www.hivtest.org for more information. You can also visit our website at www.prutehihao.org for the latest HIV statistics and regular testing hours.

We encourage the community of Guam to join the millions of people worldwide who have taken the test and taken control.

Please contact the Department of Public Health's STD/HIV Prevention Program at 735-7311, 735-7149 if you need more information.


/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ


MEASLES IMMUNIZATION PRESS RELEASE
Posted June 20, 2002

DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ, DIRECTOR,
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES,
EMPHASIZES,

PARENTS / GUARDIANS WITH CHILDREN AGES 1 TO 6,
BRING YOUR CHILDREN IN FOR
MMR IMMUNIZATION (measles, mumps, rubella vaccine).

CONTACT YOUR PRIMARY HEALTH CARE PROVIDER OR
PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES AT 735-7143 / 7148 / 7160 / 7128.

IMMUNIZE ALL CHILDREN AGES 1 TO 6!
1) BRING PARENTAL CONSENT OR GUARDIANSHIP PAPERS!

2) BRING ALL CURRENT SHOTS RECORDS;
IF RECORDS ARE NOT AVAILABLE,
IMMUNIZATIONS WILL STILL BE GIVEN!

IMMUNIZATIONS WILL BE PROVIDED AS FOLLOWS:

Dates
Times
Locations
June 24, 2002 10AM TO 2PM ROJAS COURT "NAMU AREA" - YONA
June 28, 2002 8AM TO 11 AM CENTRAL PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER, MANGILAO
June 24-27, 2002

8AM TO 11 AM;1PM – 4PM

CENTRAL PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER, MANGILAO
June 25, 2002 10AM – 2PM YIGO, GHURA 506 ACROSS FBLG
June 26, 2002 10AM – 2PM DEDEDO SWAMP ROAD
June 27, 2002 10AM – 2PM YPAO PAO ESTATES - DEDEDO
June 28, 2002 10AM – 2PM GOZUM APARTMENTS - YIGO
Call Your Clinic for Dates and Times Call Your Clinic For Locations

Private Health Care Providers

**Note** Private Health Care Providers charge a fee when providing immunizations.

IMMUNIZE YOUR CHILDREN TODAY!


/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
DIRECTOR


NEWS RELEASE
Animal Control and Quarantine Programs

Posted June 20, 2002

DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ, Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services would like to inform the public that the Animal Control and Quarantine Programs of this Department has been transferred to the Department of Agriculture. This transfer was mandated by P.L. 26-76 and was effective June 10, 2002.

With this transfer, the Department of Agriculture will be overseeing the capture and impoundment of stray animals, pick-up of unwanted pets, issuance of Entry Permits, conduct inspections of quarantine facilities, conduct investigations of biting animals. The Department will also oversee the contract agreement between Guam Animals In Need who operates the Yigo Animal Shelter as well as continue with the terms of the Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Corrections (for the pick-up of dead animal carcasses on public areas) and with the local veterinarians (for the issuance of pet licenses).

All Animal Control personnel, equipment, supplies and budgetary funding is also included in this transfer.

Dr. Steven Nusbaum, Territorial Veterinarian of the Department of Agriculture, will oversee both programs. He can be contacted at 734-3940 or 735-3965.

Dangko'lo na Si Yu'os Ma'ase.


/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


MEASLES EPIDEMIC PRESS RELEASE
Posted June 13, 2002

DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ, DIRECTOR,
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES,
EMPHASIZES THAT DUE TO THE CURRENT EPIDEMIC,

PARENTS / GUARDIANS WITH CHILDREN AGES 1 TO 6,
BRING YOUR CHILDREN IN FOR
MMR IMMUNIZATION (measles, mumps, rubella vaccine).

CONTACT YOUR PRIMARY HEALTH CARE PROVIDER OR
PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES AT 735-7143 / 7148 / 7160 / 7128.

IMMUNIZE ALL CHILDREN AGES 1 TO 6!
1) BRING PARENTAL CONSENT OR GUARDIANSHIP PAPERS!

2) BRING ALL CURRENT SHOTS RECORDS;
IF RECORDS ARE NOT AVAILABLE,
IMMUNIZATIONS WILL STILL BE GIVEN!

IMMUNIZATIONS WILL BE PROVIDED AS FOLLOWS:

Dates
Times
Locations
June 14, 2002 10AM TO 2PM PAGACHAO AGAT - GHURA OFFICE
June 14, 2002 8AM TO 11 AM CENTRAL PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER, MANGILAO
June 17-20, 2002

8AM TO 11 AM;1PM – 4PM

CENTRAL PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER, MANGILAO
June 17, 2002 10AM – 2PM ASAN COMMUNITY CENTER
June 18, 2002 10AM – 2PM COST-U-LESS TAMUNING
June 19, 2002 12PM – 4PM INARAJAN GEF PAGO
June 20, 2002 10AM – 2PM SANTA RITA COMMUNITY CENTER
June 21, 2002 8AM – 11AM AGANA HEIGHTS MAYOR'S OFFICE
June 21, 2002 8AM – 11AM CENTRAL PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER, MANGILAO
Call Your Clinic for Dates and Times Call Your Clinic For Locations

Private Health Care Providers

**Note** Private Health Care Providers charge a fee when providing immunizations.

IMMUNIZE YOUR CHILDREN TODAY!


/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
DIRECTOR


MEASLES EPIDEMIC PRESS RELEASE
Posted May 31, 2002

DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ, DIRECTOR,
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES,
EMPHASIZES THAT DUE TO THE CURRENT EPIDEMIC,

PARENTS / GUARDIANS WITH CHILDREN AGES 1 TO 6,
BRING YOUR CHILDREN IN FOR
MMR IMMUNIZATION (measles, mumps, rubella vaccine).

CONTACT YOUR PRIMARY HEALTH CARE PROVIDER OR
PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES AT 735-7143 / 7148 / 7160 / 7128.

IMMUNIZE ALL CHILDREN AGES 1 TO 6!
1) BRING PARENTAL CONSENT OR GUARDIANSHIP PAPERS!

2) BRING ALL CURRENT SHOTS RECORDS;
IF RECORDS ARE NOT AVAILABLE,
IMMUNIZATIONS WILL STILL BE GIVEN!

IMMUNIZATIONS WILL BE PROVIDED AS FOLLOWS:

Dates
Times
Locations
June 1, 2002 10AM TO 2PM PITI MAYOR’S OFFICE – SOCIAL HALL
June 3 - 14, 2002 8AM TO 11 AM;1PM TO 4 PM CENTRAL PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER, MANGILAO
June 3, 2002 10AM – 2PM YONA COMMUNITY CENTER
June 4, 2002 10AM – 2PM YIGO FIRE STATION
June 5, 2002 10AM – 2PM TAI MANGILAO – FOOTBALL FIELD
June 6, 2002 10AM – 2PM LADA GARDEN, DEDEDO
June 7, 2002 10AM – 2PM DEDEDO DOLLAR HOMES
June 10, 2002 10AM – 2PM LIGUAN TERRACE – BASEBALL FIELD, DEDEDO
June 11, 2002 10AM – 2PM TUMON VILLAGE APARTMENTS - TUMON
June 12, 2002 10AM – 2PM WUSSTIG ROAD – DEDEDO
June 13, 2002 10AM – 2PM CAMPUS MINISTRY
June 14, 2002 10AM – 2PM PAGACHAO AGAT
Call Your Clinic for Dates and Times Call Your Clinic For Locations

Private Health Care Providers

**Note** Private Health Care Providers charge a fee when providing immunizations.

IMMUNIZE YOUR CHILDREN TODAY!


/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
DIRECTOR


RENEWAL PERIOD FOR SANITARY PERMITS
Posted May 31, 2002

DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ, Director of Public Health and Social Services, would like to inform all health-regulated establishments (i.e. retailers, restaurants, hotels, institutional facilities) that the Division of Environmental Health is currently accepting applications for renewal of Sanitary Permits during the hours from 8:00 am - 11:00 am and 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm on Mondays through Fridays.

The following permit holders must provide copies of the listed documents in order to renew their Sanitary Permit:

Eating & Drinking, Food Establishment, Hotel, Tattoo, Laundry/Dry Cleaning, Swimming Pool, Mortuary, Edible Garbage, Commercial Animal Establishments, Massage Parlor, Therapeutic Massage Establishment, Penal Institution, School

1. Application for Sanitary Permit;
2. Business License (expiring 06/30/2003); and
3. Sanitary Permit (expiring 06/30/2002).


Barber Shop, Beauty Salon

1. Application for Sanitary Permit;
2. Business License (expiring 06/30/2003);
3. Sanitary Permit (expiring 06/30/2002); and
4. Establishment License (from Board of Cosmetology).


Child Care Facility

1. Application for Sanitary Permit;
2. Business License (expiring 06/30/2003); and
3. Child Care License.

Adult Day Care Center, Nursing Home

1. Application for Sanitary Permit;
2. Application for License to Operate;
3. Sanitary Permit (expiring 06/30/2002); and
4. License to Operate (Adult Day Care Center or Nursing Home, expiring 06/30/2002).

Worker's Dormitory Permit

1. Application for Sanitary Permit;
2. Notice of Action (from Territorial Land Use Commission);
3. Contractor's License; and
4. Business License (expiring 06/30/2003).


All incomplete applications will not be accepted. All health-regulated establishments are strongly encouraged to pick up and complete the Application for Sanitary Permit in advance at the Division of Environmental Health of this Department.

Should you have any questions, please contact the Processing Center Section of the Division of Environmental Health at 735-7221.


/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
Director


MEASLES EPIDEMIC PRESS RELEASE
Posted May 24, 2002

DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ, DIRECTOR, DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES, EMPHASIZES THAT DUE TO THE CURRENT EPIDEMIC,

PARENTS / GUARDIANS WITH CHILDREN AGES 1 TO 6, BRING YOUR CHILDREN IN FOR MMR IMMUNIZATION (measles, mumps, rubella vaccine).

CONTACT YOUR PRIMARY HEALTH CARE PROVIDER OR PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES AT 735-7143 / 7148 / 7160 / 7128.

IMMUNIZE ALL CHILDREN AGES 1 TO 6!
1) BRING PARENTAL CONSENT OR GUARDIANSHIP PAPERS!

2) BRING ALL CURRENT SHOTS RECORDS; IF RECORDS ARE NOT AVAILABLE, IMMUNIZATIONS WILL STILL BE GIVEN!

IMMUNIZATIONS WILL BE PROVIDED AS FOLLOWS:

Dates
Times
Locations
May 25, 2002 10AM TO 2PM BARRIGADA MAYOR’S OFFICE
May 25, 2002 10AM TO 2PM NORTHERN PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER, DEDEDO
May 25, 2002 10AM TO 2PM TAMUNING GYM
May 26, 2002 10AM TO 2PM SINAJANA COMMUNITY CENTER
May 26, 2002 10AM TO 2PM DEDEDO MAYOR’S OFFICE
May 26, 2002 12PM TO 4PM NORTHERN PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER, DEDEDO
May 27, 2002 10AM TO 2PM INARAJAN MAYOR’S OFFICE
May 27, 2002 10AM TO 2PM NORTHERN PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER, DEDEDO
May 27, 2002 10AM TO 2PM YIGO SENIOR CITIZENS’ CENTER
May 28, 2002 10:30AM TO 7PM AGAT MAYOR’S OFFICE
May 29, 2002 9AM TO 3PM AGANA HEIGHTS COMMUNITY CENTER
May 29, 2002 9AM TO 3PM MAINA CATHOLIC CHURCH
May 30, 2002 10:30AM TO 7PM CHALAN PAGO COMMUNITY CENTER
May 28 - 30, 2002 8AM TO 11 AM;1PM TO 4 PM CENTRAL PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER, MANGILAO
May 31, 2002 9AM TO 3PM ANIGUA – WEST O’BRIEN DR.(OLD FARMER’S MARKET)
May 31, 2002 9AM TO 3PM MTM – TOTO GARDEN’S
May 31, 2002 8AM TO 7PM CENTRAL PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER, MANGILAO
Call Your Clinic for Dates and Times Call Your Clinic For Locations **Note** Private Health Care Providers charge a fee when providing immunizations.

IMMUNIZE YOUR CHILDREN TODAY!

/s/
DENNIS G. RODRIGUEZ
DIRECTOR


MEASLES ALERT!
Posted May 9. 2002

Dennis G. Rodriguez, Director, Department of Public Health and Social Services, emphasizes that due to the current measles outbreak, parents/guardians with children ages one (1) to six (6), must ensure their children are immunized (1) with mmr 1 or mmr 2 (mmr-measles, mumps, rubella vaccine). Do this by contacting your primary health care Provider or Public Health and Social Services at 735-7143/7148/7160/7128.

All children ages 1 to 6 should be immunized!

Immunizations will be provided as follows:
Bring all current shots records for faster assessment!

Dates
Times
Locations
May 10, 2002
9AM TO 3PM
Yigo Gymnasium
May 11, 2002
8AM TO 5PM
Norther Public Health (Dededo-Across Wettengel Elementary)
May 11, 2002
8AM TO 5PM
Central Public Health (Mangilao-Route 4 near Legacy Square)
May 11, 2002
8AM TO 5PM
Southern Public Health (Inarajan)
May 12, 2002
Call Your Clinic For Times and Locations

Private Health Care Providers 5/11 – Psvigivstr, PMC 5/12 – SDA (8am-12pm) incl. Self-pay. **Note**Private Health Care Providers charge a fee when providing immunizations

May 13, 2002
9M TO 3PM
Yigo Gymnasium

Protect your loved ones, immunize your children now!


SENIOR CITIZENS MONTH 2002
Posted April 30, 2002

Dennis G. Rodriguez, Director of the Department of Public Health and Social Services and the Division of Senior Citizens announces that the "Senior Citizens Month 2002" celebration kicks off at 9:00 a.m. on Tuesday, April 30, 2002 with a Mass at St. Jude Thaddeus Church in Sinajana followed by the Proclamation Signing and Governor's Reception to be held at Government House, sponsored by Governor Carl T.C. Gutierrez, First Lady Geri T. Gutierrez and People Helping People.

Senior Citizens Month is an annual celebration held to honor and give special recognition to our island's manamko and includes activities coordinated and sponsored by government agencies, private and non-profit organizations and the aging network. This year's theme is "Guam: A Community for All Ages," "Komunidat Para Todu Idåt."

Among the planned events is the Governor's Conference on Aging, a collaboration with the Division of Senior Citizens and the University of Guam Institute of Micronesian Health and Aging Studies, with the introduction of the Family Caregiver Support Program, the most recent of the Division's aging programs. The conference is scheduled on May 20 & 21 for seniors and will include topics on public assistance, Social Security, case management, assistive technology, nutrition and exercise. On May 22, the conference for Caregivers and the Aging Network will include such issues as caregiver testimonials and a discussion of caregiver needs, caregiver empowerment and knowledge about nursing care at home, caregiver stress, legal implications, end-of-life planning and the medical, legal and spiritual aspects.

Other scheduled activities include the Rai/La Raina Coronation, Frail Elderly Mass, May Crowning at St. Dominic's Senior Care Home, the Legislative Reception, a Dinner Dance, Bingo Activity and an Arts and Crafts Fair. Senior citizens age sixty (60) years or older and their spouses are welcome to attend the activities. Those interested in attending who are not registered senior citizens center participants must make reservations to participate at least three (3) working days prior to the event by contacting the Division of Senior Citizens, Department of Public Health and Social Services at 475-0263/0273 and must specify if accommodations are necessary. The Division of Senior Citizens can also be contacted for additional information.


 

 

 

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